Mom’s Survival Kit: Baby Essentials (0-3 months)

Recently, a new little member joined our family. We try to be as prepared as possible, but still have an open mind. Since I have some friends who are/will be going through pregnancy and childbirth, I would like to share with you some essential items of the mom survival kit and advice for during pregnancy, childbirth, and the first three months.

This kit currently contains four parts:

  1. Pregnancy
  2. Childbirth/Hospital Stay
  3. Breastfeeding
  4. Baby essentials (0-3 months)

Disclaimer: I did not receive any compensation or free products for this review. The products below are truly what I think are useful for any mom.

2020.05.10 Baby Essentials

The final part of this kit is baby essentials for the first three months. Please check the rest of the blog for the other stages.

The first three months, the baby is still considered a newborn. The baby may not be able to do much, except sleep and cry. Crying is their only form of communication to you that they need something – comfort, food, diaper change, warmth. Over time, their awake windows lengthen, and they will start to smile and coo at you.

Here are my top items for newborn babies (0-3 months old):

  • Sleepers and onesies: sleepers are easy in the winter since they are long sleeve and have slippers attached, all in one piece! Onesies are the equivalent for the summer. A newborn doesn’t need anything fancy for everyday wear, but something that would be easy to change their diapers.
  • Nested Bean swaddles and zen sleep sack: we love these Nested Bean products. They have a little egg on the belly to act as a thin weighted blanket. It doesn’t overwhelm the tiny bodies and it still helps like a hand on their chest. They are wrapped around babies but are loose around the legs and feet (to prevent any hip issues).
  • Diapers: Diapers, particularly in newborn size, we went through a lot more than we ever imagined we would need! Gradually, the amount of poo diapers will decrease as the baby grows older, so less of the bigger sizes are needed.
  • Diaper cream, Vaseline: Applying Vaseline on a dry bum after a bath may prevent diaper rashes from occurring, as it repels water. But when diaper rashes do occur, we found diaper creams (we love this diaper cream stick we got from a baby show) help most with soothing the sore rashes.
  • Thermometer and infant Tylenol: when the baby receives shots, a thermometer is good to have on hand to see if the baby reacts with a fever. Infant Tylenol is given if they do.
  • Receiving blankets and towels: receiving blankets and towels are used for burping, spit ups, playing on the ground, diaper changes, covering up and tummy time. They are very versatile!
  • Change pad and pee pad: we place a pee pad on top of the change pads for easy clean up. It also reduces the amount of laundry we have to do. The meconium did not wash off our original changepad!
  • Bassinet, crib, and playpen: the baby needs a place to sleep. Make sure it’s a safe place to put the baby down, like a bassinet or crib. Be careful of inclined sleepers as newborn do not have the neck strength to support their necks, they may slump forward and decrease or even stop breathing!
  • Bouncer: the baby is easily entertained in a bouncer with hanging toys!
  • Mobile: sometimes the only thing that calms our baby down for an angry state is to stare at the mobile dancing around over her crib. The options to ours are music, heartbeat, or nature.
  • Toys that rattle, squeak, or crinkle: these toys provide fun as the baby learns to grab, kick, or hit toys.

 

That’s the end of the four part series on essential items for mamas and newborn babies – hope it was useful to you!

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